Rose Lerner
image

libraryjournal:

Tumblarians, your Friday Fashion statement!

image

As part of my blog tour for Sweet Disorder, I wrote a guest post at Heroes and Heartbreakers about the tradition of widows and dead first husbands in historical romance. For that post, I interviewed the authors of some of my favorite historicals with widow heroines, and I got back such awesome, detailed answers that I wanted to share the complete interviews with you. Today I close out the series with Courtney Milan talking about The Countess Conspiracy.

Violet’s mother gave her girls a pretty good grounding in proper behavior, and society did the rest. Women are supposed to defer to their husbands. They’re taught to do that, taught that men know best, taught that men are the ones that will keep them safe. So when things don’t go down that way—when the things that everyone has been telling her don’t quite turn out that way—I think it’s hard for her not to blame herself.
image

As part of my blog tour for Sweet Disorder, I wrote a guest post at Heroes and Heartbreakers about the tradition of widows and dead first husbands in historical romance. For that post, I interviewed the authors of some of my favorite historicals with widow heroines, and I got back such awesome, detailed answers that I wanted to share the complete interviews with you. Today it’s Lauren Willig talking about The Betrayal of the Blood Lily and The Garden Intrigue.

To Penelope, Freddy is largely interchangeable: he might be any good looking young man with a future title and a large income. The entire shape of the marriage market creates an image of marriage as a goal without giving any sense of the eons of time that will follow that triumphal announcement in the paper. If she did think of it, I’m sure Penelope, desperate to leave her mother’s house, would have said, with a shrug, “How bad can it be?”

image

omgthatdress:

Dress

Victor Costa, 1980s

Mill Street Vintage

image

As part of my blog tour for Sweet Disorder, I wrote a guest post at Heroes and Heartbreakers about the tradition of widows and dead first husbands in historical romance. For that post, I interviewed the authors of some of my favorite historicals with widow heroines, and I got back such awesome, detailed answers that I wanted to share the complete interviews with you. Today it’s Tessa Dare talking about Twice Tempted by a Rogue.

Here’s this handsome, sexy, wounded man who was the object of all her adolescent infatuations and quite a few of her grown-up fantasies. Now he’s suddenly come back home, after a decade of absence—and within a day, he’s decided that the two of them are destined to marry. It’s like a dream come true—and that’s exactly why she doesn’t trust it. She’s afraid that if she lets herself give into the romantic fantasy, she’ll lose what ground she’s managed to hold for herself and her community.

image

As part of my blog tour for Sweet Disorder, I wrote a guest post at Heroes and Heartbreakers about the tradition of widows and dead first husbands in historical romance. For that post, I interviewed the authors of some of my favorite historicals with widow heroines, and I got back such awesome, detailed answers that I wanted to share the complete interviews with you. Today it’s Cecilia Grant talking about A Lady Awakened.

Her journey toward falling in love runs parallel to her journey of becoming a more humane person. So by the time she makes that decision to marry again, she’s better equipped to make the decision and better equipped to be married.

image

As part of my blog tour for Sweet Disorder, I wrote a guest post at Heroes and Heartbreakers about the tradition of widows and dead first husbands in historical romance. For that post, I interviewed the authors of some of my favorite historicals with widow heroines, and I got back such awesome, detailed answers that I wanted to share the complete interviews with you. Today it’s Jeannie Lin talking about The Dragon and the Pearl, one of my favorite historical romances EVER. Seriously, mild spoiler: in this book, the hero gives the heroine a foot massage AND a tattoo. Way to hit my kinks!

It is…a recurring trope throughout history to blame the downfall of empires and emperors upon a femme fatale. Most particularly, I was thinking of the tragic love story of Concubine Yang and Emperor Xuanzhong. I’ve always believed historians conveniently vilified these women of power when THE DUDE IS THE EMPEROR OF THE REALM!!!!! Don’t you think he was pretty good at ruling and playing politics? Shouldn’t he, like, maybe take some responsibility?

image

ALEX: Instead of backing us up, you put a gun to Birkhoff’s dead, and you tried to shoot Michael.

OWEN/SAM: In my defense, it was Michael.